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Fri 28 Mar 2008

Today, NUS LT20: 4pm - Barry Brook on "Climate Change: Feeling the Tropical Heat"

Category : talks

Department of Biological Sciences 
Seminar Announcement 

"Climate Change: Feeling the Tropical Heat"
by Barry W. Brook
Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change 
Professor and Director, Research Institute for Climate Change and Sustainability
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide 

Date:  Fri, 28 Mar 2008
Time: 4 pm
Venue: Lecture Theatre 20

Host: Professor Navjot Sodhi 

Abstract - We have so far had less than one degree of recent global warming, yet it is already affecting the lives of millions of people and thousands of species. Indeed, climate change is increasingly seen as one of the most urgent challenges facing the global community, with its consequences expected to rapidly worsen during this century. 

Professor Brook will review the most recent observations of climate change impacts and describe the latest scientific projections for the near future. His focus will be on tropical impacts and examples of recent response of tropical systems, such as rain forest and reefs, to climate change. Taken together, these studies strongly imply that we are pushing the Earth perilously close to catastrophic and irreversible ‘tipping points’ in physical, biological and ultimately social systems. 

He will also discuss the ways in which we can implement solutions to mitigate, and adapt to, the coming challenges posed by climate change. But we have to act fast to make a real difference. 

About the speaker - Professor Barry Brook is an international research leader in global ecology and conservation biology. He holds the Foundation Sir Hubert Wilkins Chair of Climate Change and is Director of the Research Institute for Climate Change and Sustainability at the University of Adelaide. He has published two books and over 120 scientific papers on various aspects of human impacts on the natural environment and biodiversity, including climate change, deforestation and overexploitation of populations.

In 2006, he was awarded both the Australian Academy of Science Fenner Medal for distinguished research in biology and the Edgeworth David Medal by the Royal Society of New South Wales, and in 2007, the H.G. Andrewartha Medal by the Royal Society of South Australia and was listed by Cosmos as one of Australia’s top 10 young scientists. The principal motivation for his research is to identify ways and means of reducing extinctions and mitigating the worst ravages of global change.

Posted at 1:28AM UTC by N. Sivasothi | permalink | email | Raffles Museum news