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Fri 08 Oct 2004

Environmentalist Wangari Maathai wins Nobel Peace Prize

Category : envt

"Kenyan environmental activist Wangari Maathai won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for her work as leader of the Green Belt Movement, which has sought to empower women, improve the environment and fight corruption in Africa for almost 30 years.

≥Many of the wars in Africa are fought over natural resources,≤ she told The Associated Press. ≥Ensuring they are not destroyed is a way of ensuring there is no conflict.≤ Readthe complete report at MSNBC News Services, 8 Oct 2004.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee explained in a statement why it had made what in many observers' view was a surprising choice: ≥Peace on earth depends on our ability to secure our living environment. Maathai stands at the front of the fight to promote ecologically viable social, economic and cultural development in Kenya and in Africa. She has taken a holistic approach to sustainable development that embraces democracy, human rights and women's rights in particular. She thinks globally and acts locally.≤ [Norway News, 8th Oct 2004]

"Wangari Maathai founded the Green Belt movement in Kenya in 1977, which has planted more than 10 million trees to prevent soil erosion and provide firewood for cooking fires. The program has been carried out primarily by women in the villages of Kenya, who through protecting their environment and through the paid employment for planting the trees are able to better care for their children and their children's future."

Learn more about Wangari Maathai at About.com's Women in History and In Context.

Thanks to Anand B. for the alert

Posted at 5:35PM UTC by N. Sivasothi | permalink | email |

Fri 08 Oct 2004

Joseph Lai reports on Syngramma alismifolia in Nee Soon

Category : nature

Joseph Lai rejoices in his sighting of Syngramma alismifolia, a shade-loving terrestrial fern in Nee Soon Freshwater Swamp on 7th October 2004.

Once common, it has become as rare as the freshwater swamp forests of Singapore.

Posted at 2:57AM UTC by N. Sivasothi | permalink | email | Raffles Museum news