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Author/Editor:
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Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore. Since 1998 with origins from OneList.


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Tue 13 Apr 2004

Recent news reports - Hopea sangal sculpture and Pedal Ubin

Category : news

"Felled heritage tree is now art for all to see." By Sarah Ng, Streats, 08 Apr 2004. [pdf] "Said Dr Ho Yew Kee, deputy chief executive officer of the Wildlife Reserves Singapore, the parent company of the zoo: "With the planting of the seedling, we hope that over the next 150 years, the Hopea sangal tree will grow to its majestic height of 35m, giving future generations the opportunity to appreciate a live Hopea sangal tree.""

"New nature-cum-heritage guided bicycle trail to discover Ubin." By Bridgette See, Channel News Asia, 11 Apr 2004. [pdf] "A group of cyclists and nature lovers have banded together to launch a free nature-cum-heritage guided trail called "Pedal Ubin". Instead of walking, the tours at Pulau Ubin will bring participants to the far ends of the island on bicycles. "Pedal because we want to sell (peddle) Ubin, and pedal because we want to cycle Ubin, so for Pedal Ubin we're selling Ubin on a bicycle," said Airani Ramli, Pedal Ubin's project manager."

This project was resucitated to introduce to the public aspects of nature and heritage in Ubin beyond Chek Jawa. Sign up at the home page.

Posted at 5:52AM UTC by N. Sivasothi | permalink | email |

Tue 13 Apr 2004

Wildlife misdemeanors in the Straits Times today

Category : news

"NUS student fined $5,600 for mini wildlife zoo"
"A 26-year old student from the National University of Singapore (NUS) was fined $5,600 last month for keeping 22 wild and endangered animals in his West Coast Drive flat."

'The mini zoo included 14 assorted snakes - seven boa constrictors, six pythons and one anaconda. - which he kept in his toilet and bedroom. The snakes removed from Lok's flat were protected species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, or Cites.'

"Anyone caught importing or exporting such animals without a permit can be fined up to $5,000 per species and jailed for up to one year. And for keeping wildlife without a licence, offenders can be charged under the Wild Animals and Birds Act and fined up to $1,000 per animal."

The complete article is at the Straits Times, 13 Apr 2004. [pdf]

 

Parrot eggs back after illegal trip to Sydney
Excerpts - 'Last Saturday, 41 parrot eggs were secreted out of Singapore, hidden in a specially made vest under a man's clothes. The next day, 34 eggs were flown back to Singapore for donation to the Jurong BirdPark in much the same way. This time they were carried by the assistant director of Australian Customs, Mr Nick Walton.'

'The eggs are believed to be from species of macaws, and are estimated to have a street value of S$319,000. They are expected to hatch within the next three weeks. These colourful South American birds are protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.'

'The 49-year-old Malaysian who had allegedly tried to smuggle them into Australia was arrested on arrival at Sydney airport and charged in an Australian court on Sunday. Singapore's Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority is also investigating the case.'

Complete article at the Straits Times, 13 Apr 2004. [pdf]

Posted at 5:44AM UTC by N. Sivasothi | permalink | email |

Tue 13 Apr 2004

Black shouldered kites (Elanus caeruleus) - a photo story

Category : nature

After recces in late 2003 - early 2004 revealed a suitable nesting pair of Black-shouldered kites, these photographers collaborated to observe, photograph and write an article: Singapore's Fabulous Kites, Part 1 & Part 2, by Vincent Quek, Graeme Guy & Dennis Ho is available at the webpage of the Nature Photographic Society (S).

The article includes not only hints for photographing birds of prey but also how the team worked together and and their observations of parent and fledgling kites over several weekends providing an additional dimension to the photography.

I found the photos breath-taking so I wrote in for permission to feature the article and some of their photos. You see here cropped images from their webpage showing the hide they initially used when the chicks were very young, the chicks in their nest, an adult in flight and an adult with a rat prey in its talons. See the articl for the complete story and photos.

Posted at 2:10AM UTC by N. Sivasothi | permalink | email | Raffles Museum news